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Samsung’s Galaxy S5 is the first smartphone that can use a fingerprint to authorize payments in stores and online

See on Scoop.it - Life the Universe and Everything.

Anyone with an iPhone 5 can use its fingerprint reader to unlock the device and pay for apps or music in Apple’s iTunes store. Owners of Samsung’s latest flagship device, the Galaxy S5 smartphone, which launches on April 11, will be able to make much broader use of their fingerprints to pay for things. If they visit a website or app that accepts PayPal using the device, they can authorize payments by swiping a finger across the phone’s home button. And PayPal’s own mobile app can be used to pay for goods in some physical stores in the U.S.

Fingerprint payments are likely to be offered on many more smartphones in the near future. The Galaxy S5’s payments system is the first commercial deployment of a new protocol developed by the FIDO Alliance, a group founded by tech companies to end our reliance on insecure passwords (see “PayPal, Lenovo Launch Campaign to Kill the Password”). Indeed, fingerprint readers are expected to become commonplace on mobile devices over the next year or so (see “A Technological Assault on the Password”).

“Today people are having to type in nine-digit passwords everywhere, including one-handed on the subway,” says Joel Yarbrough, senior director of global product solutions at PayPal. This leads many people to use simple passwords and to reuse them across multiple services. This, in turn, makes it easier for criminals to take control of accounts. “Building a smart biometric experience solves both usability and dramatically increases the security level,” says Yarbrough.

 
See on technologyreview.com

sciencenote:

Unifying Energies, Forces , Dimensions in one and only equation , since Einstein Scientists tried and still trying to translate the beautiful  universe’s Harmony in even the most beautiful language -Maths- !

In theoretical physics, M-theory is an extension of string theory in which 11 dimensions of spacetime are identified as 7 higher-dimensions plus the 4 common dimensions (11D st = 7 hd + 4D). Proponents believe that the 11-dimensional theory unites all five 10-dimensional string theories (10D st = 6 hd + 4D) and supersedes them. Though a full description of the theory is not known, the low-entropy dynamics are known to be supergravity interacting with 2- and 5-dimensional membranes.

This idea is the unique supersymmetric theory in 11 dimensions (11D), with its low-entropy matter content and interactions fully determined, and can be obtained as the strong coupling limit of type IIA string theory because a new dimension of space emerges[clarification needed] as the coupling constant increases.

Drawing on the work of a number of string theorists (including Ashoke Sen, Chris Hull, Paul Townsend, Michael Duff and John Schwarz), Edward Witten of the Institute for Advanced Study suggested its existence at a conference at USC in 1995, and used M-theory to explain a number of previously observed dualities, initiating a flurry of new research in string theory called the second superstring revolution.

In the early 1990s, it was shown that the various superstring theories were related by dualities which allow the description of an object in one super string theory to be related to the description of a different object in another super string theory. These relationships imply that each of the super string theories is a different aspect of a single underlying theory, proposed by Witten, and named “M-theory”.

wildcat2030:

Can an electric ‘thinking cap’ improve learning? - Vanderbilt University ->Original Study
- It may be possible to selectively manipulate our ability to learn by sending a mild electrical current to the brain, a new study suggests. The findings, which also show that the effect can be enhanced or depressed depending on the direction of the current, may extend beyond the potential to improve learning, researchers say. They could have clinical benefits in the treatment of conditions like schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, which are associated with performance-monitoring deficits. The medial-frontal cortex is believed to be the part of the brain responsible for the instinctive “Oops!” response we have when we make a mistake. Previous studies have shown that a spike of negative voltage originates from this area of the brain milliseconds after a person makes a mistake, but not why. For a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers wanted to test the idea that this activity influences learning because it allows the brain to learn from our mistakes. “And that’s what we set out to test: What is the actual function of these brainwaves?” says psychologist Robert Reinhart, a Ph.D. candidate at Vanderbilt University. “We wanted to reach into your brain and causally control your inner critic.” Reinhart and Geoffrey Woodman, assistant professor of psychology, set out to test several hypotheses: One, they wanted to establish that it is possible to control the brain’s electrophysiological response to mistakes, and two, that its effect could be intentionally regulated up or down depending on the direction of an electrical current applied to it. This bi-directionality had been observed before in animal studies, but not in humans. Additionally, the researchers set out to see how long the effect lasted and whether the results could be generalized to other tasks. (via Can an electric ‘thinking cap’ improve learning? | Futurity)
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wildcat2030:

Can an electric ‘thinking cap’ improve learning?
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Vanderbilt University ->Original Study

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It may be possible to selectively manipulate our ability to learn by sending a mild electrical current to the brain, a new study suggests. The findings, which also show that the effect can be enhanced or depressed depending on the direction of the current, may extend beyond the potential to improve learning, researchers say. They could have clinical benefits in the treatment of conditions like schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, which are associated with performance-monitoring deficits. The medial-frontal cortex is believed to be the part of the brain responsible for the instinctive “Oops!” response we have when we make a mistake. Previous studies have shown that a spike of negative voltage originates from this area of the brain milliseconds after a person makes a mistake, but not why. For a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers wanted to test the idea that this activity influences learning because it allows the brain to learn from our mistakes. “And that’s what we set out to test: What is the actual function of these brainwaves?” says psychologist Robert Reinhart, a Ph.D. candidate at Vanderbilt University. “We wanted to reach into your brain and causally control your inner critic.” Reinhart and Geoffrey Woodman, assistant professor of psychology, set out to test several hypotheses: One, they wanted to establish that it is possible to control the brain’s electrophysiological response to mistakes, and two, that its effect could be intentionally regulated up or down depending on the direction of an electrical current applied to it. This bi-directionality had been observed before in animal studies, but not in humans. Additionally, the researchers set out to see how long the effect lasted and whether the results could be generalized to other tasks. (via Can an electric ‘thinking cap’ improve learning? | Futurity)

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